Reminds drug deaths leave victims grieving

COURTESY TO THE BELLINGHAM HERALDAugust 29, 2013 

We lost our beloved son to a drug overdose last week.

Our boy had struggled for 20 years with chemical addiction, making recoveries and relapsing throughout that time, but we never believed his battle would end in such a pointless way. His passing was not in the patriotic service of his country, for a religious belief system or even a political ideology. His passing served only heinous, evil spirits intent upon the destruction of our youth and the very fabric of America as we know it.

We often hear people say that drugs and those who would ply society with their poison should be treated with more lenient policies because they commit supposedly "victimless" crimes. While naked violence may not always be the result of chemical use, I would point to the hundreds of thousands of fathers, mothers, aunts, uncles, grandparents, brothers, sisters, wives, husbands and children of those living with a drug-addicted person and ask if they feel as though they are victims.

As survivors of this tragedy, my family most assuredly can testify to the pain and suffering caused by the passage of one so dearly loved.

In my mind that is the very essence of being made a "victim."

When given the opportunity to repel the effort to legalize or decriminalize chemical use, please remember our son and fight against this ever growing wave of madness, death and waste.

Konrad Lau

Sedro-Woolley

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