Nisqually programs run weekends through the summer

Staff reportJune 30, 2013 

Visitors to the Nisqually National Wildlife refuge can learn more about the area’s history, about the creatures who live there and how to improve their outdoor photography skills by attending a weekend interpretive program.

The summer-long series will conclude Sept. 18 with the Nisqually Watershed Festival.

Programs will last one to two hours, depending on the presenter and topic. Unless otherwise noted, all programs leave from the refuge’s visitor center. The refuge’s walking trails are beginner level, they are smooth with no elevation gain.

Participants should wear comfortable shoes and dress for the weather. Feel free to bring binoculars or you can check some out at the visitor center.

The programs are free, but the $3 refuge entrance fee (admits four adults, children admitted free) still applies.

Pets are not allowed at the refuge, and biking and running are prohibited.

For more information, call the refuge at 360-753-9467.

Schedule

Saturday: “Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Many species of bird, from the tiny Rufous hummingbird to the bald eagle, nest at the refuge. Experienced birder Eric Slagle will lead this guided walk. Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the visitor center.

“How to Keep a Wave on the Sand: Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m. In this hands-on workshop, writer and photographer Greg Farley will teach participants to take their camera off the automatic settings and apply basic and professional outdoor photography techniques. Bring your camera (film, DSLR, or point and shoot) and extra batteries. Meet in the visitor center auditorium.

July 7: “It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild,” 9–11 a.m. From bitterns to butterflies, chickadees to crab apples, the refuge is home to a multitude of wildlife. Naturalist Jan Seguin will lead this nature walk that will teach participants something new about the creatures of the refuge.

July 13: “Birds of a Feather: Take Flight on a Bird Walk,” 9–11 a.m.

July 20: “Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

July 27: “Birding Basics: Learning to See,” 9–11 a.m. An experienced birders uses subtle clues to quickly and accurately identify species. Birding really is the art of seeing, so the techniques used by birders increase awareness of all natural things. refuge ranger Michael Schramm will guide a walk through the estuary’s diverse habitats for a birding experience, while teaching the ins and outs of birding. Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the visitor center. Bring binoculars.

Aug. 3: “Birds of a Feather,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Aug. 4: “It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild,” 9–11 a.m.

“The Nisqually and Medicine Creek: Where Nature, Culture and History Converge,” 1-2:30 p.m. Learn about the events surrounding the signing of the Medicine Creek Treaty. Also learn how the Nisqually Indians came to the Nisqually River delta and how their lives changed with the settlement of Europeans. Lynn Corliss will lead this program. Meet at the flagpole in front of the visitor center.

Aug. 10: “Birds of a Feather,” 9–11 a.m.

“Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Aug. 24: “Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

“It’s in Your Nature: Exploring the Wild,” 10 a.m.–noon. Naturalists Art Pavey, Jan Kramer, and Cheri Greenwood will lead this nature walk.

Aug. 25: “Our Amazing Plant World,” 1–2:30 p.m. Summer is the time to experience the diversity of the refuge’s plant life. Join Sally Vogel on a nature walk while learning about plant-insect interactions, adaptations for survival and interesting facts. Meet at the flagpole in front of the visitor center.

Aug. 31: “Birds of a Feather,” 8:30 a.m.-noon. Perhaps you will get to see a peregrine falcon (the world’s fastest bird) or of hear a woodpecker pecking away at a tree. Experienced birder David Richardson leads this guided walk. Meet at the landing overlooking the pond at the visitor center.

Sept. 1: “It’s in Your Nature,” 9–11 a.m.

Sept. 7: “Birds of a Feather,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

“Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

September 8: “The Nisqually and Medicine Creek,” 1-2:30 p.m.

Sept. 14: “Capturing the Outdoors in Photographs,” 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Sept: 28: Nisqually Watershed Festival, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Take tours and guided walks throughout the day. There also will be music, live animal presentations, education exhibits, a marine touch tank, and Fin, the Wild Olympic Salmon. Join the celebration of the cultural, economic and natural resources of the Nisqually River watershed.

Bellingham Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service